December 2007

NORTHWEST VEG

We educate and empower people to make vegetarian choices for a healthy, sustainable, and compassionate world.

(503) 224-7380
info@nwveg.org

www.nwveg.org

Contents

1. Class 2 of the Master Vegetarian Program to Begin in February
2. “Ask the Nutritionist” Column to Debut in January
3. Local Vegan Chef, Teacher, and Author to Present at December 16 Potluck
4. Second Vegan Holiday Festival Draws 1,200 — and Media Accolades
5. Bay Leaf to Host December 9 Veg Dine-out
6. Vegan-friendly in Milwaukie! Who Knew?
7. Northwest VEG Publishes 4th Edition of Veg Dining & Shopping Guide
8. "Fabulous” New Website Offers Restaurant Reviews and More
9. New Book Argues for Cooperation Between Animal Rights and Social Justice Movements

E-Bits is edited by Charley Korns. If you are interested in writing for future E-Bits editions, please email info@nwveg.org. The next deadline is Jan. 21, 2008.

1. Class 2 of the Master Vegetarian Program to Begins in February

Northwest VEG's pilot Master Vegetarian Program this fall was a great success. We had information-packed sessions on nutrition, diet and disease, environmental ramifications of food choices, organic agriculture, factory farming practices, and other issues regarding food and plant-based diets. The 30 participants who completed the series gave the classes rave reviews.

With this success, we have decided to go ahead and make this a regular series, continuing the same successful model that was developed first in the Master Gardener and Master Recycler Programs by other organizations. The next Master Vegetarian Program classes are scheduled to begin on Feb. 5 or Feb. 12 (to be determined). Classes will meet for 2 hours each Tuesday evening for 8 consecutive weeks; plus, two weekend field trips will be arranged. Thanks to People's Food Co-op and the National College of Natural Medicine for co-sponsoring the Master Vegetarian Program with Northwest VEG and for providing classroom space!

Registration for Class 2 of the Master Vegetarian Program will begin in early to mid December, and more details will be posted to the Northwest VEG website in early December. For more information or if you want to be notified when registration opens, send an email to Susan Hanson at susan(at)nwveg.org, and we will make sure you get the registration information right away when registration opens.

2. 'Ask the Nutritionist' Column to Debut in January

Next month Tammy Russell, M.S., a Registered Dietitian, will begin a nutrition column in the NW VEG Thymes, which is published around the first of every odd-numbered month. Tammy (pictured with daughter Sabine at VegFest 2007) welcomes questions about nutritional concerns related to a vegetarian or vegan diet. She will select one question to address in each issue. You may email her at noemie1226@msn.com. You can meet Tammy at the Northwest VEG potluck on Sunday, Jan. 20; after the meal she will give a talk on basic vegetarian nutrition. See the January NW VEG Thymes for the potluck’s location and time.

Tammy is stepping down from her volunteer position as editor of the NW VEG Thymes, which she has done for the past several years. Northwest VEG is grateful for her service and looks forward to her continued involvement as a columnist. Tammy provides vegan nutritional consulting at Integrated Medicine Group, a Northwest VEG business partner, located at 163 NE 102nd Ave., Portland, (503) 257-3327. Owners Dr. Richard Heitsch, M.D., and Christy Heitsch embrace a vegan lifestyle, and nearly all supplements and health-related products offered at the clinic are vegan. Northwest VEG members receive a 15% discount on supplements. Visit www.integratedmedicinegroup.com.

3. Local Vegan Chef, Teacher, and Author to Present at December 16 Potluck

Author, instructor, and vegan chef David Gabbe will discuss vegan cooking at the Northwest VEG potluck on Sunday, Dec. 16, from 5 pm to 7:30 pm. David is a popular instructor in Portland and throughout the Western states. He is the author of five books including: From David's Pure Vegetarian Kitchen, The Going Vegetarian Cookbook, and Why Do Vegetarians Eat Like That? David will provide dessert samples and offer his books for sale.

The potluck will take place at the West Hills Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 8470 SW Oleson Rd., Portland. Please bring a vegan or vegetarian main dish, salad or dessert, a card listing its ingredients, and plates and utensils for your use. If you come alone, figure the amount to serve 4-6; increase the amount 4 servings for each additional person in your party/family. Northwest VEG potlucks are alcohol-free events, and we start eating about 5:15 pm. For more information call (503) 224-7380 or email info@nwveg.org. If you can volunteer to help at the potluck, please contact volunteer@nwveg.org or call (503) 224-7380. A donation of $2-5 per person is suggested to help cover the cost of the room rental.

4. Second Vegan Holiday Festival Draws 1,200 — and Media Accolades
By Charley Korns, E-Bits Editor

In early September 2007, the 2nd Annual Vegan Holiday Festival presented by Robert Cheeke, founder of www.veganbodybuilding.com, was little more than a vision. Then things started to gel as Robert formed an organizing team. It’s clear by now that underestimating the potential of Robert’s vision is not wise. Thanks to the efforts of Robert and a group of key volunteers, the festival started to pull together, quickly securing the same venue that hosted the Portland VegFest last May: Benson High School.

Modeling much of the festival after earlier VegFests and the first Vegan Holiday Festival, the groundwork was set for the November 3 festival. A number of sponsors came on board, including Northwest VEG, Vega, Vegan Bodybuilding & Fitness, Blossoming Lotus, VegNews Magazine, Food Fight Vegan Grocery, Papa G’s Vegan Organics, and Field Roast Grain Meats. Presenters were lined up before the leaves began to fall. Speakers included Robert, triathlete and author Brendan Brazier, and Northwest VEG president Peter Spendelow. The festival scheduled chefs Al Chase, Xavi Cortal, Julie Hasson, and Piper Dixon to demonstrate various dishes and show how easy it is to prepare delicious vegan food during the holidays — or any time. New this year were small workshops featuring yoga, bellydancing, crafts, and a literary reading from local sci fi and horror author David Agranoff.

The festival, which was free to the public, included approximately 50 exhibitors that paid for the opportunity to sample and sell their products and services. From 10 am to 6 pm, attendees enjoyed scores of vegan product samples and learned from the presenters. A silent auction helped raise money for the festival and Northwest VEG.

The media seemed to dote on the festival like no other previous local veg event. A preview in the It List column of Willamette Week expressed respect for the athleticism of the presenters and encouraged attendance. A post-festival piece in the Oregonian led with, “It's not every day you get to taste tempeh mashed yams, shop for faux leather or mingle in a crowd that includes a vegan bodybuilder. But you could do that and more at last weekend's Vegan Holiday Festival. The idea? To change minds — and menus.” The Oregonian article also quoted festival media coordinator Emily Pepe to describe the reason for the festival’s timing: "It's a time of year when there's a lot of animal slaughter.” In addition to print media coverage KINK and KBOO provided enthusiastic public service announcements and/or mentions by DJs.

Thanks to all the volunteers who made this year’s festival another awesome success! The 3rd Annual Vegan Holiday Festival will take place again in November 2008, but first comes the 4th Annual Portland VegFest in Spring 2008. A committee is already planning the event and needs more volunteers. Please contact jill@nwveg.org if you would like to join in the planning.

5. Bay Leaf to Host December 9 Veg Dine-out

Can't get enough of the hotpot dong po tofu? It's one of many Asian classics-with-a-twist available at Bay Leaf Vegetarian restaurant. Others include Thai fried rice with basil, sweet sesame tofu, and spicy mustard greens with tofu. They also have an extensive and interesting tea menu, as well as vegan desserts by Sweetpea Baking and Piece of Cake. If any of this sounds good to you, please sign up for the next Northwest VEG dine-out, taking place at 1 pm on Sunday, Dec. 9, at Bay Leaf. The address is 4768 SE Division St., in Portland. The monthly dine-outs provide a chance to hang out over lunch or dinner, partaking of only vegetarian/vegan items offered by area restaurants. To RSVP, email Maren at marensouders@mindspring.com by Dec. 6. We will be limiting our number to 25, so secure your seat early! To learn more about the restaurant, visit www.bayleafvegetarian.com.

6. Vegan-friendly in Milwaukie! Who Knew?
By Maren Souders, Contributing Writer

On November 8, I visited Hartwell’s, the vegan-friendly restaurant which quietly opened recently in Milwaukie, Oregon. Overall, the food was excellent. The menu offered four vegan entrees ($12 to $15) and five vegan appetizers ($5 to $8). One of the two daily soups was vegan. Located in a brand-new building downtown, the space is open and inviting. Tables are dressed with white cloths and fresh flowers. The vegan co-owner warmly greeted my two friends and me. Throughout our visit, service was friendly and attentive.

First we received a bread basket with margarine, olive oil, and pumpkin spread. Shortly afterward (perhaps because we’d mentioned it was my birthday) the server brought a complimentary appetizer not on the menu: sweet pea puree with a Yamhill County mushroom and balsamic reduction. It was delicious, as was the appetizer we ordered: lentil-walnut pate with tofu “sour cream” and truffle oil, served with rice crackers. While my friends ordered fish — and raved about it — I tried the vegetable potpie. I enjoyed it, though I found it a bit heavier than expected. The entire dessert case is vegan. The chocolate mousse looked delectable, but we opted for the wheat-free chocolate cake and a scoop of the house-made vanilla “ice cream.” The cake was slightly disappointing, with a texture reminiscent of cornmeal; but the frozen dessert was delicate, with a hint of maple flavor.

Hartwell’s also offers a full bar. Hours are Wednesday through Sunday, lunch 11-2, dinner 5-10. Visit the restaurant at 10608 SE Main St., Milwaukie, (503) 387-5866.

7. Northwest VEG Publishes 4th Edition of Veg Dining & Shopping Guide

The 4th edition of the Northwest VEG Dining & Shopping Guide to Portland and Vancouver was printed in November. The guide lists 7 vegan (new additions include Bye and Bye, Nutshell, SweetPea Baking Company), 21 vegetarian (new additions include Backspace Café, Chaos Café, The Lion’s Den Café, Sweet Lemon Vegetarian Bistro), and 30 veg-friendly restaurants and food carts, including addresses, phone numbers, and hours. One vegan, 1 vegetarian, and 6 veg-friendly markets are included, along with 6 sources for vegan baked goods and 4 outlets for vegan supplies, cookbooks, classes and clothing. Thanks to volunteers Maia Koczy and Susan Bliss for calling restaurants to verify hours!

The guide also mentions key reasons to become vegetarian: for the animals, the planet, and health. The guides are available at Northwest VEG potlucks and can also be found in PDF format, suitable for double-sided printing to legal-sized paper, at www.nwveg.org/Dineout.htm.

8. 'Fabulous' New Website Offers Restaurant Reviews and More

Need a few tips on vegan-friendly restaurants in the Portland-Vancouver area? You might check out a new site called www.veganfabulous.com. The site’s founder and webmaster, whose pseudonym is Megan Fabulous, grew up in once-rural Battle Ground, WA, with a freezer full of beef and a fridge stocked with milk. Now her burgers are made with tempeh and she has almond milk in her cereal. She describes the site as her “journey on eating fabulously vegan.” In addition to Portland-area restaurant reviews, she has posted food reviews from other regions, book reviews, and recipes.

In her latest review, Megan spotlights Dove Vivi, 2727 NE Glisan St., Portland. From the website: “Forget about cheese-less pizza or soy cheese, Dove Vivi offers a house-made tofu ricotta that had die-hard cheese eaters believing it was real! I am a huge fan of anything cornmeal and the thought of a deep-dish pizza with cornmeal crust was just about enough to make me crack up. I finally got a chance to go last night with a huge group of friends and it was nothing less than out of this world. We ordered the top five pizzas on the menu and everyone in our group was grabbing for their second and third slices. The vegan pizza (which I luckily only had to share with one other person) was the most incredible vegan pizza implementation I have had. The thick crust was layered with peppers, onions, mushrooms, and eggplant smothered with the tofu ricotta.” Contact Dove Vivi at (503) 239-4444 or www.dovevivipizza.com. Upcoming restaurant reviews will include Chaos Café and Maiden in the Mist.

9. New Book Argues for Cooperation Between Animal Rights and Social Justice Movements

According to author Bob Torres, he wrote his new book, Making a Killing: The Political Economy of Animal Rights (AK Press, 2007), because “the Left needs animal liberation, and animal liberation needs the Left. The struggle for social justice cannot be a complete project if we ignore the suffering of the least and most voiceless among us. Similarly, the animal rights movement cannot truly argue for justice for animals if it doesn't care about justice for humans. My hope is that this book will generate a discussion on the nature of hierarchy and domination within capitalism, and encourage us all to think beyond the confines that have defined our activism so far.”

From the Amazon.com site, “Torres draws broadly upon Left theory to show how human oppression and animal oppression are intertwined through the exploitative dynamics of capitalism. With a focus on labor, property, and the life of commodities, Making a Killing contains key insights on the nature of domination, power, and hierarchy, and argues for a critical social theory that understands the human domination of nature in terms of the domination of human by human. An eye-opener for readers concerned with progressive politics, animal welfare — or both.”

Torres, assistant professor of sociology at St. Lawrence University, received his Ph.D. from Cornell University and co-authored Vegan Freak: Being Vegan in a Non-Vegan World.